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Acerca de CARE

Desde 1980 y el inicio del Esfuerzo de Refugiados de Alberta Central, mucho ha cambiado con respecto a quién viene a Canadá de otros países y por qué viene. Fundado  por un grupo de ciudadanos preocupados que querían ayudar con el asentamiento de refugiados indochinos que huían de las secuelas de la Guerra de Vietnam, el enfoque de la sociedad en 1980 fue ayudar a los refugiados que llegaban al centro de Alberta.

En los últimos 30 años, a quién servimos y por qué ayudamos se ha convertido en mucho más que un esfuerzo para servir solo a los refugiados . Gran parte de la comunidad de Newcomers  también son inmigrantes que se mudan a Canadá por elección. Los inmigrantes que llegan al centro de Alberta a menudo necesitan recursos diferentes a los de los refugiados y nuestros servicios han evolucionado para satisfacer esa necesidad. La única parte del Esfuerzo de Refugiados de Alberta Central que no ha evolucionado es el nombre.  

Este año, al entrar en nuestra cuarta década sirviendo y apoyando a los recién llegados, queríamos hacer la transición para representar adecuadamente todo lo que servimos y cómo la comunidad reconoce nuestro trabajo.

  • What is a CLBA?
    A CLBA is the Canadian Literacy Benchmark Assessment that determines where a person's English skills fall on an ESL scale from 1-5. It determines a learner's English proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A newcomer must complete a CLBA before a CARE Language Coordinator can begin organizing English lessons in the proper class. The CLBA is free for newcomers or a fee-for-service for others.
  • Are there night classes available?
    Yes, night classes are available for anyone wishing to improve their English. While there is a fee, there are supports available to qualifying applicants. Please speak to a Language Coordinator about Care for Newcomers' ESL evening class funding options. Get started with a Language Assesment
  • How do I manage childcare while I am in class?
    Students with pre-school children who wish to take Care for Newcomers' adult daytime ESL classes can register for the Community-Based Childcare for Newcomers (CB-CNC) program. Childcare is available both on and offsite with government-approved childcare providers who offer a fun and safe environment for students' little ones. The Foundations for Women class also provides on-site childcare. However, there is a waiting list, and it is wise to register for childcare as soon as possible. Speak to your Language Coordinator for more information.
  • How often are Care for Newcomers' English classes?
    Daytime adult LINC ESL classes are part-time in morning and evening classes. In addition, our Care for Newcomers LINK classes are open for registration year-round for permanent Canadian residents and broken up into two semesters. Evening ESL classes are two times a week in fall, spring, and summer sessions between 6 and 12 weeks. Classes run between 6 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Students can then supplement their skills with a Conversation Circle, women's and men's groups, or evening ESL classes.
  • How do I connect an immigrant to ESL classes?
    If you, or someone you know, needs help learning English in Central Alberta, please get in touch with the Care for Newcomers main office at 403-346-8818 or by email info@carefornewcomers.ca. Our Care for Newcomers team can help you coordinate registration and a CLBA for our English as a Second Language class.
  • Where do children and youth take ESL classes?
    ESL for children and youth is taught within our school system. Once newcomers register their kids in school, SWIS and ESWIS workers will coordinate resources through Care for Newcomers and other government agencies to provide newcomer youth and their families all the services they need, including learning English.
  • How much English do I need to know to take Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Newcomers' English skills can range from being fluent to having no English, depending on their situation. For example, some immigrants began preparing for their move by taking English lessons, whereas refugees fled from their homes and could know little to no English. Regardless of how much English they know, our Care for Newcomers Language Coordinators assist newcomers by first using a CLBA to assess their skill level and then placing them in the correct ESL level class.
  • How long does it take to start taking Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers aims to get students into English classes as quickly as possible. The wait time depends on what class the student qualifies for and is interested in and where the start of the course falls in the calendar. It can take approximately two months from registration for students to begin taking ESL classes. However, enrollment is ongoing year-round, and our Language Coordinators are happy to help you plan your schedule. While you wait for your ESL class to begin, our Language Coordinator will connect you with any Care for Newcomers services and programs that you need to settle into our community.
  • Who teaches Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers' certified English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors teach newcomers English at every level. Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak English with the help of teacher's aides and volunteers who help translate, answer questions, and improve pronunciation.
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