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LLAME AL 403-346-8818
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Juventud  ASENTAMIENTO

Programa de jóvenes inmigrantes en el centro de Alberta

Joining a new community is easier for newcomers with introductions to people, events, the chance to learn, and a feeling that they are welcome and belong. Care for Newcomers connects caring volunteer Canadians with Newcomers and their families to help them feel more comfortable with life in Canada.

When newcomers connect directly to people in their new communities, they have an easier time understanding English, making new friends, and learning more about Canadian culture.

 

Settlement in a new country is hard, but Care for Newcomers provides the chance to meet new people who understand and work to simplify the process with services, volunteer companions, and access to cultural events of all kinds.

 

As newcomers become actively involved in their new Canadian community, they find others like them and a sense of belonging— a sign that Canada welcomes many cultures and backgrounds. Indeed, we build a bridge between newcomers and Canadians for successful settlement and fellowship.

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Companionship at Care for Newcomers means we introduce a Canadian volunteer to a newcomer as a one-to-one match to help them learn about daily life in Canada. With this fellowship or guide, newcomers get help learning about:

 

  • Services

  • Everyday English

  • Shopping

  • Cultural events

  • Community landmarks

  • Areas of interest

  • And much more!

 

Our goal is to give newcomers the chance to learn about Canada and their new community from a personal viewpoint, one where they can also ask questions from someone who happily volunteers their time and knowledge.

 

**Also known as Canada Connects Match Program

  • What is a CLBA?
    A CLBA is the Canadian Literacy Benchmark Assessment that determines where a person's English skills fall on an ESL scale from 1-5. It determines a learner's English proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A newcomer must complete a CLBA before a CARE Language Coordinator can begin organizing English lessons in the proper class. The CLBA is free for newcomers or a fee-for-service for others.
  • Are there night classes available?
    Yes, night classes are available for anyone wishing to improve their English. While there is a fee, there are supports available to qualifying applicants. Please speak to a Language Coordinator about Care for Newcomers' ESL evening class funding options. Get started with a Language Assesment
  • How do I manage childcare while I am in class?
    Students with pre-school children who wish to take Care for Newcomers' adult daytime ESL classes can register for the Community-Based Childcare for Newcomers (CB-CNC) program. Childcare is available both on and offsite with government-approved childcare providers who offer a fun and safe environment for students' little ones. The Foundations for Women class also provides on-site childcare. However, there is a waiting list, and it is wise to register for childcare as soon as possible. Speak to your Language Coordinator for more information.
  • How often are Care for Newcomers' English classes?
    Daytime adult LINC ESL classes are part-time in morning and evening classes. In addition, our Care for Newcomers LINK classes are open for registration year-round for permanent Canadian residents and broken up into two semesters. Evening ESL classes are two times a week in fall, spring, and summer sessions between 6 and 12 weeks. Classes run between 6 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Students can then supplement their skills with a Conversation Circle, women's and men's groups, or evening ESL classes.
  • How do I connect an immigrant to ESL classes?
    If you, or someone you know, needs help learning English in Central Alberta, please get in touch with the Care for Newcomers main office at 403-346-8818 or by email info@carefornewcomers.ca. Our Care for Newcomers team can help you coordinate registration and a CLBA for our English as a Second Language class.
  • Where do children and youth take ESL classes?
    ESL for children and youth is taught within our school system. Once newcomers register their kids in school, SWIS and ESWIS workers will coordinate resources through Care for Newcomers and other government agencies to provide newcomer youth and their families all the services they need, including learning English.
  • How much English do I need to know to take Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Newcomers' English skills can range from being fluent to having no English, depending on their situation. For example, some immigrants began preparing for their move by taking English lessons, whereas refugees fled from their homes and could know little to no English. Regardless of how much English they know, our Care for Newcomers Language Coordinators assist newcomers by first using a CLBA to assess their skill level and then placing them in the correct ESL level class.
  • How long does it take to start taking Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers aims to get students into English classes as quickly as possible. The wait time depends on what class the student qualifies for and is interested in and where the start of the course falls in the calendar. It can take approximately two months from registration for students to begin taking ESL classes. However, enrollment is ongoing year-round, and our Language Coordinators are happy to help you plan your schedule. While you wait for your ESL class to begin, our Language Coordinator will connect you with any Care for Newcomers services and programs that you need to settle into our community.
  • Who teaches Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers' certified English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors teach newcomers English at every level. Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak English with the help of teacher's aides and volunteers who help translate, answer questions, and improve pronunciation.
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Care for Newcomers has weekly activities and events to help Newcomers learn about their new Albertan community and meet new people.  Through our events and activities, Newcomers get to:

 

  • Meet people and socialize

  • Improve English skills

  • Learn about local landmarks

  • Discover new cultures and celebrate their own

  • Try crafts, sports, or games

  • Volunteer in the community

  • Enjoy new experiences with our help

 

Our Care Workers plan events with the help of volunteers, including other Newcomers, to help make settling into Canada easier and lessen feelings of being alone or uncertain.

 

If you or someone you know is interested, see our Activities & Events Calendar, and please register by contacting us at the Care for Newcomers office or the button below.

  • What is a CLBA?
    A CLBA is the Canadian Literacy Benchmark Assessment that determines where a person's English skills fall on an ESL scale from 1-5. It determines a learner's English proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A newcomer must complete a CLBA before a CARE Language Coordinator can begin organizing English lessons in the proper class. The CLBA is free for newcomers or a fee-for-service for others.
  • Are there night classes available?
    Yes, night classes are available for anyone wishing to improve their English. While there is a fee, there are supports available to qualifying applicants. Please speak to a Language Coordinator about Care for Newcomers' ESL evening class funding options. Get started with a Language Assesment
  • How do I manage childcare while I am in class?
    Students with pre-school children who wish to take Care for Newcomers' adult daytime ESL classes can register for the Community-Based Childcare for Newcomers (CB-CNC) program. Childcare is available both on and offsite with government-approved childcare providers who offer a fun and safe environment for students' little ones. The Foundations for Women class also provides on-site childcare. However, there is a waiting list, and it is wise to register for childcare as soon as possible. Speak to your Language Coordinator for more information.
  • How often are Care for Newcomers' English classes?
    Daytime adult LINC ESL classes are part-time in morning and evening classes. In addition, our Care for Newcomers LINK classes are open for registration year-round for permanent Canadian residents and broken up into two semesters. Evening ESL classes are two times a week in fall, spring, and summer sessions between 6 and 12 weeks. Classes run between 6 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Students can then supplement their skills with a Conversation Circle, women's and men's groups, or evening ESL classes.
  • How do I connect an immigrant to ESL classes?
    If you, or someone you know, needs help learning English in Central Alberta, please get in touch with the Care for Newcomers main office at 403-346-8818 or by email info@carefornewcomers.ca. Our Care for Newcomers team can help you coordinate registration and a CLBA for our English as a Second Language class.
  • Where do children and youth take ESL classes?
    ESL for children and youth is taught within our school system. Once newcomers register their kids in school, SWIS and ESWIS workers will coordinate resources through Care for Newcomers and other government agencies to provide newcomer youth and their families all the services they need, including learning English.
  • How much English do I need to know to take Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Newcomers' English skills can range from being fluent to having no English, depending on their situation. For example, some immigrants began preparing for their move by taking English lessons, whereas refugees fled from their homes and could know little to no English. Regardless of how much English they know, our Care for Newcomers Language Coordinators assist newcomers by first using a CLBA to assess their skill level and then placing them in the correct ESL level class.
  • How long does it take to start taking Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers aims to get students into English classes as quickly as possible. The wait time depends on what class the student qualifies for and is interested in and where the start of the course falls in the calendar. It can take approximately two months from registration for students to begin taking ESL classes. However, enrollment is ongoing year-round, and our Language Coordinators are happy to help you plan your schedule. While you wait for your ESL class to begin, our Language Coordinator will connect you with any Care for Newcomers services and programs that you need to settle into our community.
  • Who teaches Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers' certified English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors teach newcomers English at every level. Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak English with the help of teacher's aides and volunteers who help translate, answer questions, and improve pronunciation.
Serie Listo para el Talento

Volunteering in the community benefits everyone and is an important part of Care for Newcomers. When you become a Care Volunteer, you meet new people, learn about their cultures,  and introduce Newcomers to Canadian culture while attending activities and events. 

 

It is a beautiful way to connect, help others, make a difference in the lives of others, build a Canadian resume, and make friends. Our Care Volunteers help bring a welcoming and inclusive atmosphere to Central Alberta communities and participate in the following:

 

  • Companionship: one-to-one matches that pair Canadians, Newcomers, and resident volunteers with newly-arrived Newcomers to help them learn about life in Canada and feel more comfortable in their new community.

  • Interpretation and Translation: interpreters and translator volunteers help Newcomers understand and communicate during needs like education, appointments, conversation, and documents.

  • Public Awareness: present and share culture and immigration experiences with schools, public groups, and other agencies to help our community connect with Newcomers and their journeys.

  • Groups: Volunteers help Newcomers meet new people, learn, and settle easier through language groups, men’s and women’s groups, SNAP youth groups, and group activities and events.

  • Employer Work Experience: local businesses and companies offer work experience and training time to help Newcomers gain valuable new skills for their resume and possible employment.

  • General Volunteering: share skills and talents for various activities, administrative needs, fundraising, trade shows, and community events.

  • Volunteer Board Member: oversees the direction and management of Care for Newcomers, ensuring quality services for immigrants, refugees, and Canadians.

 

 

Care for Newcomers volunteers helps open our community to newcomers by generously sharing their time and experience. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact us or register here.

  • What is a CLBA?
    A CLBA is the Canadian Literacy Benchmark Assessment that determines where a person's English skills fall on an ESL scale from 1-5. It determines a learner's English proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A newcomer must complete a CLBA before a CARE Language Coordinator can begin organizing English lessons in the proper class. The CLBA is free for newcomers or a fee-for-service for others.
  • Are there night classes available?
    Yes, night classes are available for anyone wishing to improve their English. While there is a fee, there are supports available to qualifying applicants. Please speak to a Language Coordinator about Care for Newcomers' ESL evening class funding options. Get started with a Language Assesment
  • How do I manage childcare while I am in class?
    Students with pre-school children who wish to take Care for Newcomers' adult daytime ESL classes can register for the Community-Based Childcare for Newcomers (CB-CNC) program. Childcare is available both on and offsite with government-approved childcare providers who offer a fun and safe environment for students' little ones. The Foundations for Women class also provides on-site childcare. However, there is a waiting list, and it is wise to register for childcare as soon as possible. Speak to your Language Coordinator for more information.
  • How often are Care for Newcomers' English classes?
    Daytime adult LINC ESL classes are part-time in morning and evening classes. In addition, our Care for Newcomers LINK classes are open for registration year-round for permanent Canadian residents and broken up into two semesters. Evening ESL classes are two times a week in fall, spring, and summer sessions between 6 and 12 weeks. Classes run between 6 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Students can then supplement their skills with a Conversation Circle, women's and men's groups, or evening ESL classes.
  • How do I connect an immigrant to ESL classes?
    If you, or someone you know, needs help learning English in Central Alberta, please get in touch with the Care for Newcomers main office at 403-346-8818 or by email info@carefornewcomers.ca. Our Care for Newcomers team can help you coordinate registration and a CLBA for our English as a Second Language class.
  • Where do children and youth take ESL classes?
    ESL for children and youth is taught within our school system. Once newcomers register their kids in school, SWIS and ESWIS workers will coordinate resources through Care for Newcomers and other government agencies to provide newcomer youth and their families all the services they need, including learning English.
  • How much English do I need to know to take Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Newcomers' English skills can range from being fluent to having no English, depending on their situation. For example, some immigrants began preparing for their move by taking English lessons, whereas refugees fled from their homes and could know little to no English. Regardless of how much English they know, our Care for Newcomers Language Coordinators assist newcomers by first using a CLBA to assess their skill level and then placing them in the correct ESL level class.
  • How long does it take to start taking Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers aims to get students into English classes as quickly as possible. The wait time depends on what class the student qualifies for and is interested in and where the start of the course falls in the calendar. It can take approximately two months from registration for students to begin taking ESL classes. However, enrollment is ongoing year-round, and our Language Coordinators are happy to help you plan your schedule. While you wait for your ESL class to begin, our Language Coordinator will connect you with any Care for Newcomers services and programs that you need to settle into our community.
  • Who teaches Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers' certified English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors teach newcomers English at every level. Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak English with the help of teacher's aides and volunteers who help translate, answer questions, and improve pronunciation.
Serie Listo para el Talento

One of the best ways to learn English is with practice. Care for Newcomers provides language groups, or conversation circles, to help Newcomers practice their speaking, reading, and writing skills outside the classroom.

 

These guided groups include topics like:

 

  • Banking

  • Healthcare

  • Shopping

  • Sports and recreation

  • Making appointments

  • Education

  • Employment

  • Transportation

  • Community events

 

Newcomers are welcome to join our conversation and reading groups to continue learning English and feel more comfortable in our community. Speak to a Care Worker about what language group would be best for you and your family members.

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At Care for Newcomers, we believe that it takes an entire community to make Newcomers feel at home, and like the African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child,” it takes a village to help settle Newcomers and their families.

 

Part of this process is to help the general public understand and appreciate the different cultures, traditions, and experiences that Newcomers bring to our society.

That is why we offer our Public Awareness program, where we provide free intercultural workshops, cultural presentations and events, and anti-racism training for anyone interested in increasing knowledge and creating a more welcoming and inclusive community in Central Alberta.

 

Our Public Awareness workshops help provide resources in Red Deer and Central Alberta communities to grow inclusivity, acceptance, and cultural awareness as Newcomers settle into Canada and become active citizens of our society.

 

Care for Newcomers Public Awareness workshops include:

 

For schools, libraries, and youth groups:

  • Presentations on cultures, traditions, and celebrations

  • Help for students to develop their cultural and global understanding

  • Discussion of social justice issues

 

For colleges, organizations, institutions, agencies, and the public,

  • Intercultural training workshops

  • Presentations on a variety of cultural and immigration topics

  • Encouragement to understand of the challenges of settlement and integration

 

Cultural Events:

  • World Refugee Day

  • Alberta Culture Day Projects

  • International Anti-Racism Event

  • International Mother Language Day

  • Cultural Cafes on a variety of topics

  • We can tailor all presentations to meet the specific needs of your group or organization

 

Contact us for more information.

  • What is a CLBA?
    A CLBA is the Canadian Literacy Benchmark Assessment that determines where a person's English skills fall on an ESL scale from 1-5. It determines a learner's English proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A newcomer must complete a CLBA before a CARE Language Coordinator can begin organizing English lessons in the proper class. The CLBA is free for newcomers or a fee-for-service for others.
  • Are there night classes available?
    Yes, night classes are available for anyone wishing to improve their English. While there is a fee, there are supports available to qualifying applicants. Please speak to a Language Coordinator about Care for Newcomers' ESL evening class funding options. Get started with a Language Assesment
  • How do I manage childcare while I am in class?
    Students with pre-school children who wish to take Care for Newcomers' adult daytime ESL classes can register for the Community-Based Childcare for Newcomers (CB-CNC) program. Childcare is available both on and offsite with government-approved childcare providers who offer a fun and safe environment for students' little ones. The Foundations for Women class also provides on-site childcare. However, there is a waiting list, and it is wise to register for childcare as soon as possible. Speak to your Language Coordinator for more information.
  • How often are Care for Newcomers' English classes?
    Daytime adult LINC ESL classes are part-time in morning and evening classes. In addition, our Care for Newcomers LINK classes are open for registration year-round for permanent Canadian residents and broken up into two semesters. Evening ESL classes are two times a week in fall, spring, and summer sessions between 6 and 12 weeks. Classes run between 6 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Students can then supplement their skills with a Conversation Circle, women's and men's groups, or evening ESL classes.
  • How do I connect an immigrant to ESL classes?
    If you, or someone you know, needs help learning English in Central Alberta, please get in touch with the Care for Newcomers main office at 403-346-8818 or by email info@carefornewcomers.ca. Our Care for Newcomers team can help you coordinate registration and a CLBA for our English as a Second Language class.
  • Where do children and youth take ESL classes?
    ESL for children and youth is taught within our school system. Once newcomers register their kids in school, SWIS and ESWIS workers will coordinate resources through Care for Newcomers and other government agencies to provide newcomer youth and their families all the services they need, including learning English.
  • How much English do I need to know to take Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Newcomers' English skills can range from being fluent to having no English, depending on their situation. For example, some immigrants began preparing for their move by taking English lessons, whereas refugees fled from their homes and could know little to no English. Regardless of how much English they know, our Care for Newcomers Language Coordinators assist newcomers by first using a CLBA to assess their skill level and then placing them in the correct ESL level class.
  • How long does it take to start taking Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers aims to get students into English classes as quickly as possible. The wait time depends on what class the student qualifies for and is interested in and where the start of the course falls in the calendar. It can take approximately two months from registration for students to begin taking ESL classes. However, enrollment is ongoing year-round, and our Language Coordinators are happy to help you plan your schedule. While you wait for your ESL class to begin, our Language Coordinator will connect you with any Care for Newcomers services and programs that you need to settle into our community.
  • Who teaches Care for Newcomers' ESL classes?
    Care for Newcomers' certified English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors teach newcomers English at every level. Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak English with the help of teacher's aides and volunteers who help translate, answer questions, and improve pronunciation.
 “We like to visit with our Canadian family and practice English. Practicing English is very important to me, helps me speak better. We learned a lot about Canadian culture and lifestyle. Now, we appreciate more what a great country Canada is."
“We like to visit with our Canadian family and practice English. Practicing English is very important to me, helps me speak better. We learned a lot about Canadian culture and lifestyle. Now, we appreciate more what a great country Canada is…”
“Volunteering with my refugee friend really opened my eyes to some of the hardships he had to endure…and learning how much I take for granted like being able to drive, go shopping, get groceries, etc. My overall experience as a volunteer with Care is an amazing one that I will cherish forever.”
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